3 Costly Home Selling Mistakes Before You List Your Residence

For home sellers, it is essential to dedicate the necessary time and resources to streamline the process of adding your property to the real estate market. In addition, you should prepare for any challenges that you may encounter after your home is listed. By doing so, you can avoid many costly mistakes.

Ultimately, there are numerous costly mistakes that may prevent a home seller from optimizing the value of his or her residence, including:

1. Underestimating Your Closing Costs

Closing costs may put a major dent in how much you obtain for your house. Fortunately, you can calculate your closing costs before you sell your home.

Consider all of the expenses that may be included in your closing costs. From attorney and other professional fees to excise tax expenses, you’ll want to account for any and all costs that may impact how much you’ll earn for your house.

Also, if you ever have concerns or questions about closing costs, be sure to consult with a real estate agent. This housing market professional can explain how closing costs work and help you plan accordingly.

2. Guessing Your Home’s Price

What you paid for your home several years ago is unlikely to be what the same as what your house is worth today. Thankfully, you can meet with a home appraiser to determine the true value of your property.

A home appraisal offers a great first step to determining the right price for your home. Meanwhile, a home appraiser may be able to help you identify home problems that you can correct prior to adding your home to the real estate market.

Furthermore, don’t forget to check out the prices of comparable homes that are available in your area. This will provide you with the housing market data that you need you to price your home competitively from the get-go, boosting your chances for a quick home sale.

3. Letting Your Emotions Get in the Way

Let’s face it – listing your home can be stressful, particularly for a first-time home seller. However, it is important to do whatever you can to prevent your emotions from getting in the way of selling your home.

Setting realistic home selling expectations may enable you to remain calm, cool and collected after you list your property. Luckily, real estate agents are available to guide you along the home selling journey and ensure that you are fully supported at every stage.

Your real estate agent will offer expert tips and recommendations, allowing you to understand the ins and outs of the real estate market. He or she also will negotiate with homebuyers on your behalf, keep you up to date about offers on your residences and host open houses to promote your residence to a broad array of homebuyers. Thus, your real estate agent can help you avoid the stress and anxiety that is commonly associated with selling a home.

Avoid the aforementioned home selling mistakes, and you should have no trouble maximizing the value of your residence.

Spring Tasks To Complete Before Selling Your Home

If you want to sell your home, spring is a great time to get started readying yourself for the process. Since most people don’t want to carry two mortgages, you’ll need to sell your home before buying a new one. If you do decide to buy and sell simultaneously, beware of contingencies. If you place a contingency that you’ll buy a new home on the condition that you sell your old home first, the deal could soon be out the window. All this aside, preparing to sell can go a long way as far as your dollar and attracting buyers.  

Market Your Home

As most home searches begin online, you’ll need good pictures of your home. Video walk-throughs are also common and helpful in selling many homes. You should work with your real estate agent to be sure that you have a marketing plan ready for execution. This will include sharing on social media and even blogs. Many times, hiring a professional is helpful to get these photos done. You could even get advice from marketing specialists to be sure that the process is being executed well. All of these seemingly little touches can help to drive additional traffic to a home listing. 

Testing The Market Equals Off The Market

If you’re thinking of “testing” the price of your home, it’s probably not a good idea. When the price of your home is too high from the start, people will lose interest quickly. If you start the sale of your home this way, you’ll end up needing to cut the price of the property quite significantly at some point. 

Do Your Research

Buyers also have an idea of what’s reasonably priced and what isn’t. Smart buyers will hold out as they know you’ll be dropping the price of the home fairly soon. Keep in mind that a well-priced home also will bring in much more traffic than a home that has been priced unreasonably. This can be a benefit to you as a seller. 

Make Green Improvements To Your Home


Making improvements to your home not only adds value to it, but makes it more attractive. Today’s environmentally conscious buyers appreciate the effort that sellers put in to go green. If you have the opportunity to put in solar panels or low flow toilets, do so for a big return and a home that’s more appeasing to buyers.

On the other side of “green” improvements is the landscaping. Before you put your home on the market, be sure to spruce up the yard. Curb appeal is a big deal to today’s buyers. Taking the time to make the lawn look well-groomed and put in some new shrubbery can really go a long way. When potential buyers pull up to the home, they’ll be able to see themselves living there.

Running a Successful Yard Sale

Online retailers like eBay, Pop Sugar and Bonanza prove that selling used products pays off. They aren’t alone. Consignment stores and charities also realize the worth in used items. These organizations are doing what homeowners who host yard sales have been doing for years. They are taking furniture, clothes, toys, household accessories and other items and making them available, at a reasonable price, to people who find them valuable.

Tips to Make Your Yard Sale a Winner
Host a yard sale and you could use the money to pay for a vacation, your children’s school clothes, concert tickets or another expense. To increase the chances that your yard sale will be successful:

  • Pick the right day and time. Yard sales are often held on Saturdays. Be open to holding a yard sale on a weekday to attract college students, parents and self-employed people who work from home. Schedule a rain date in the event that the weather takes a sudden turn.
  • Get enough help. Solicit the help of family and friends. Assign someone to operate the cash register, someone to field customer questions and someone to help carry large items to customers’ vehicles. Ask two other people to roam the area, answering customer questions and providing security so no one walks off with items without paying.
  • Position art pieces, great values and attention grabbers near corners and curbs, to attract visitors. Colorful items, especially items with bright, large print, attract attention which is exactly what you want.
  • Group toys, clothes, furniture and other items together to make it easy for visitors to find what they want. The easier you make it for visitors to pick up what they want, the quicker you may land a sale.
  • Have enough change and consider accepting debit and credit card payments. The last thing that you want is to watch a potential sale walk off because you didn’t have change to handle their purchase. Keep dollar bills, fives, tens and two to three rolls of quarters, dimes, nickels and pennies on hand.
  • Promote your yard sale online and offline. Post information about your yard sale at your social media accounts, places like Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. Tell your colleagues and neighbors that you’re having a yard sale. Be sure to let them know the day and time of the yard sale.
  • Put signs in your yard a few days prior to the yard sale. Add the date and time for the yard sale to each sign. Make sure that the signs are large and printed in bright colors like red and white.
  • Ask visitors to spread the word about your yard sale. When people visit your yard sale, ask them to tell at least one other person about your yard sale. If they bring two or more people with them to your yard sale, consider giving the referrer a discount on an item that they purchase.
  • Offer great deals but make sure that you generate a profit. Research online prices for similar items that you are selling. Try to beat online and offline deals, but make sure that your yard sale is profitable.

By hosting a yard sale, you’ll be cleaning your home. You’ll also create more space for newness. And you’ll offer household items to people who find the items valuable. Host three or more yard sales a year and you may learn additional ways to yield more success from the sales. With experience and the right amount of advertising, you could generate $1,000 or more off of each yard sale that you host.

Learn About the History of Your Home

Do you know the history of your home? How you respond to this question may dictate whether you’re equipped to maximize the value of your residence.

As a home seller, you’ll want to know when your home was built and other facts about the condition of your residence before you add it to the real estate market. And with the right amount of research, you should be able to find out plenty about your residence and share this information with prospective homebuyers.

Some of the key home history questions that every home seller should consider include:

1. How Old Is Your Home’s Roof?

An old roof could become a costly repair that no homeowner wants to encounter. However, home sellers who understand when their roof has been repaired or replaced can share this information with homebuyers and empower these buyers with additional details to help them make an informed decision.

Remember, an old roof won’t necessarily deter homebuyers from checking out your house. At the same time, you’ll want to account for your roof’s condition when you price your residence.

Also, you may consider completing roof renovations before you list your home on the real estate market, as these repairs may help differentiate your residence from similar homes that are available.

2. When Was Your Hot Water Heater and/or Furnace Replaced?

A homebuyer surely wants a home that is easy to heat. And if you’ve replaced your home’s hot water heater or furnace recently, you likely will be better equipped to optimize the value of your residence.

If you’re uncertain about the age of your home’s hot water heater or furnace, you’ll want to have these items tested by professionals to ensure their quality.

Typically, an average hot water heater will last between eight and 12 years; comparatively, an oil furnace usually will last up to 10 years, while a gas furnace may perform well for up to 20 years. And if it’s been some time since these products have been repaired or replaced, you may want to consider installing new ones before you add your home to the real estate market.

3. What Is the Age of Your Air Conditioning System?

While the hot water heater and furnace are likely to generate concerns from homebuyers, the condition of your home’s air conditioning system probably will do the same.

Like many appliances, your home’s A/C system will start to break down over an extended period of time. This commonly happens after 10 to 15 years, but home sellers who have maintained and repaired their A/C system regularly may be able to reduce the need to replace this unit.

Focus on finding out as much information as possible about your home and sharing this information with homebuyers. By doing so, you are able to be fully transparent about what your residence offers homebuyers. Thus, you may be able to speed up the process of selling your home.

Dedicate the time and resources needed to learn about the history of your home, and ultimately, you’ll be better equipped to find homebuyers who are interested in your residence.